LEARNING ACTIVITY
Creating an Indigenous plant-use garden: planting
Climate Region: Arid | Temperate | Tropical
State or Territory: ACT | All States/Territories | NSW | NT | QLD | SA | TAS | VIC | WA
Age Range: 13-18

STORY

Jarrah and Adam have completed a site assessment for the new garden and prepared the site for planting. Jarrah has invited some of his friends to help him plant the garden. They have lots of fun planting and get it done in record time. They are all so happy and start to leave the garden.

Adam called “Jarrah! You’re not finished yet mate. Remember I told you these plants need a good water and some mulch around them for added protection and to keep the weeds at bay!” Jarrah called his friends back over and they got stuck in to the mulching and watering. The garden looked beautiful and they were all very proud of their achievements.

ACTIVITY OVERVIEW

Planting out your garden is an exciting and fulfilling task. It is also a great opportunity to get your hands dirty and connect with nature.

To understand local perspectives and support these activities, we recommend reaching out to the local Traditional Owners and First Nations peoples community groups who can assist in knowledge sharing and understanding local land, histories and culture. This is an important consideration to ensure that any reconciliation initiatives are being driven in a local, meaningful way.

This learning activity is the fifth part of a sequence of 6 individual learning activities focused on creating an Indigenous plant- use garden. The order of these learning activities are: resources from the bush, vision, plant list, site assessment, planting and harvesting.

Outcomes

For children to:

  • follow instructions and a planting plan
  • understand the steps involved in planting out and maintaining a successful Indigenous plant-use garden
  • enjoy being active and productive outdoors and build their social and teamwork skills
  • physically be involved in the planting of the Indigenous plant-use garden develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of First Nations peoples culture through traditional use of native plants.
SEASONAL NOTES

Planting is best done in a pre-prepared garden bed, either raised or worked over ground. Choose the plants from your plant list learning activity. During the warmer months (Spring, Summer and Autumn), it is recommended that you run this as a morning learning activity. This will help avoid heat stress for people and plants.

Did you know?

Plant small native fruit and root vegetables in groups. These plants are better suited to a raised garden bed as it provides better drainage. Use good native potting mix soil and regular watering.

Did you know?

It is best to plant between Autumn and early Spring, and not late Spring to Summer. However, most natives are perennial or long-living, and can be planted in the cooler months, giving them time to grow deeper roots before the summer heat.

Did you know?

When they are seedlings, native plants require more water to survive. This is when they are most vulnerable to evaporation and the roots drying out.

Did you know?

Plant small native fruit and root vegetables in groups. These plants are better suited to a raised garden bed as it provides better drainage. Use good native potting mix soil and regular watering.

Why not try one of our other Junior Landcare learning activities?

Whose Country: exploring First Nations peoples languages map (0-7yrs)

Indigenous Perspectives

Creating an Indigenous plant-use garden: site assessment

Indigenous Perspectives

Creating an Indigenous plant-use garden: resources from the bush

Indigenous Perspectives

Creating an Indigenous plant-use garden: harvesting

Indigenous Perspectives